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AASWomen Newsletter for April 12, 2024

AstronomyAASWomen Newsletter for April 12, 2024


AAS Committee on the Status of Women
Issue of April 12, 2024
eds: Jeremy Bailin, Nicolle Zellner, Sethanne Howard, and Hannah Jang-Condell

[We hope you all are taking care of yourselves and each other. –eds.]

This week’s issues:

1. Career Profile: Jörg Matthias Determann Records Modern Science History
2. The Victorian Woman Who Chased Eclipses
3. Women end up doing the academic housework
4. Job Opportunities
5. How to Submit to the AASWOMEN newsletter
6. How to Subscribe or Unsubscribe to the AASWOMEN newsletter
7. Access to Past Issues

An online version of this newsletter will be available at http://womeninastronomy.blogspot.com/ at 3:00 PM ET every Friday.


1. Career Profile: Jörg Matthias Determann Records Modern Science History

From: Nicolle Zellner via womeninastronomy.blogspot.com

The AAS Committee on the Status of Women in Astronomy has compiled dozens of interviews highlighting the diversity of career trajectories available to astronomers, planetary scientists, etc. The interviews share advice and lessons learned from individuals on those paths.

Below is our interview with Jörg Matthias Determann, a professor and historian of science in the Department of Liberal Arts & Sciences at Virginia Commonwealth University in Qatar. He holds a doctorate from the School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS), University of London, and two master’s degrees from the University of Vienna. He is the author of five books including Islam, Science Fiction and Extraterrestrial Life and Space Science and the Arab World. He is also co-editor of a volume on Islamic Theology and Extraterrestrial Life. In February 2024, we profiled his book Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion in Astronomy.

Read more at

https://womeninastronomy.blogspot.com/2024/04/career-profile-jorg-matthias-determann.html

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2. The Victorian Woman Who Chased Eclipses

From: Jeremy Bailin [jbailin_at_ua.edu]

By Samia Bouzid, Katie Hafner & The Lost Women Of Science Initiative

Annie Maunder was an astronomer who expanded our understanding of the sun at the turn of the 20th century. Her passion was photographing eclipses.

“It is December 1897 in England, and Annie Maunder, an amateur astronomer, is boarding a steamship bound for India. Her goal: to photograph a total solar eclipse. Like the many people in North America whose gaze will turn upward on April 8, Maunder was fascinated by the secrets of the sun and was determined to travel the globe and unlock them. She understood that the few minutes of darkness during a solar eclipse presented a special opportunity to explore the nature of the sun. Her observations led to our greater understanding of how our star affects Earth, but like so many early female scientists, her contributions and achievements have been forgotten.”

Read more and listen to the podcast at

https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/the-victorian-woman-who-chased-eclipses/

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3. Women end up doing the academic housework

From: Jeremy Bailin [jbailin_at_ua.edu]

By Gunn Kvalsvik

While women actively participate in the practical work at their organisation, men dodge it.

The findings of a new study from Danish academia are clear: Men dodge service jobs, leaving them to women.

The findings were so clear that even the researchers were surprised.

Read more at

https://kifinfo.no/en/2024/03/women-end-doing-academic-housework

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4. Job Opportunities

For those interested in increasing excellence and diversity in their organizations, a list of resources and advice is here:

https://aas.org/comms/cswa/resources/Diversity#howtoincrease

– UMass Lowell has a faculty opening in Engineering under NSF’s Faculty Development in geoSpace Science program:

https://explorejobs.uml.edu/lowell/en-us/job/522632/assistant-professor-electrical-computer-engineering

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5. How to Submit to the AASWOMEN newsletter

To submit an item to the AASWOMEN newsletter, including replies to topics, send email to aaswomen_at_lists.aas.org .

All material will be posted unless you tell us otherwise, including your email address.

When submitting a job posting for inclusion in the newsletter, please include a one-line description and a link to the full job posting.

Please remember to replace “_at_” in the e-mail address above.

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6. How to Subscribe or Unsubscribe to the AASWOMEN newsletter

Join AAS Women List through the online portal:

To Subscribe, go to https://aas.simplelists.com/aaswlist/subscribe/ and enter your name and email address, and click Subscribe. You will be sent an email with a link to click to confirm subscription.

To unsubscribe from AAS Women by email:

Go to https://aas.simplelists.com, in the “My account and unsubscriptions”, type your email address. You will receive an email with a link to access your account, from there you can click the unsubscribe link for this mailing list.

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7. Access to Past Issues

http://womeninastronomy.blogspot.com/search/label/AASWOMEN

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