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AASWomen Newsletter for April 5, 2024

AstronomyAASWomen Newsletter for April 5, 2024


AAS Committee on the Status of Women
Issue of April 5, 2024
eds: Jeremy Bailin, Nicolle Zellner, Sethanne Howard, and Hannah Jang-Condell

[We hope you all are taking care of yourselves and each other. –eds.]

This week’s issues:
1. Sexism in academia wastes public funding and is bad for science 
2. Women Eclipse Chasers
3. Meet 5 women pushing the boundaries through NOAA’s work in space 4. Meet the Two Women Leading Space Station Science 
5. We asked over 50 women space leaders for words of inspiration. Here’s what they told us 
6. The State of Girls in STEM: A Conversation to Plan Action
7. How to Submit to the AASWomen Newsletter
8. How to Subscribe or Unsubscribe to the AASWomen Newsletter
9. Access to Past Issues of the AASWomen Newsletter

An online version of this newsletter will be available at http://womeninastronomy.blogspot.com/ at 3:00 PM ET every Friday.

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1. Sexism in academia wastes public funding and is bad for science
From: Nicolle Zellner via womeninastronomy.blogspot.com

In their article for Nature Reviews Materials, Sexism in academia is bad for science and a waste of public funding, Nicole Boivin, Susanne Täuber, Ulrike Beisiegel, Ursula Keller, and Janet Hering write that higher education and research institutions “are critical to the well-being and success of societies, meaning their financial support is strongly in the public interest.”

Read more at

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2. Women Eclipse Chasers
From: Thomas Hockey via womeninastronomy.blogspot.com

[Eds note: This is a reposted item from October 5, 2023. Here’s hoping for clear skies on April 8!]

Sometimes science and politics overlap in serendipitous ways. One just has to look for them.

The trans-continental 7 August 1869 total eclipse of the Sun was the first for which scientific observation was expected to have a spectroscopic component. It also was the inaugural in the United States at which a significant number of women participated in its study.

Read more at

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3. Meet 5 women pushing the boundaries through NOAA’s work in space
From: Jeremy Bailin [jbailin_at_ua.edu]

Meet 5 women leaders helping to advance NOAA’s work in space, from research and policy to the development of satellite systems.

Read more at

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4. Meet the Two Women Leading Space Station Science 
From: Jeremy Bailin [jbailin_at_ua.edu]

Employees in the International Space Station Research Integration Office at NASA’s Johnson Space Center help enable and execute the research opportunities only available on board the space station with a wide variety of researchers. They also look out for and coordinate new partnerships with international partners, academic organizations, commercial companies, and more.

Two women are currently spearheading these efforts: International Space Station Program Chief Scientist Jennifer Buchli and International Space Station Program Deputy Chief Scientist Meghan Everett. Together, they lead the full suite of research and science happening on board the orbital outpost.

Read more at

By Meredith Garofalo

We wouldn’t be where we are today without the leaders of the past — so, to build our future, perhaps we should celebrate the innovators of our present. 

The history of women’s contributions to the space industry is significantly shorter than it is for men,  simply because women were dealt a delayed start in the race. For example, NASA’s astronaut program began in 1959, but it wasn’t until 1978 when the agency’s lineup of astronaut candidates finally included women. Yet, thanks to many brave trailblazers who pushed against the unfair boundaries of equality in space exploration, the number of leading ladies writing their way into history books has risen rapidly. Decades later, I think it’s safe to say that, although we still have more work to do, a lot of great work has been done.

Read more at

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6. The State of Girls in STEM: A Conversation to Plan Action
From: Sethanne Howard [sethanneh_at_msn.com]

National Girls Collaborative Project (NGCP) organized and held a national convening last fall, to bring together thought leaders for a candid conversation on the persistent issues facing girls and women in STEM. The purpose of these conversations was to create an action agenda for accelerating solutions to make real progress related to girls’ and women’s representation and experiences in STEM.

Throughout the meeting, the following themes emerged: the importance of centering girls’ voices and valuing girls’ unique experiences, learning from existing efforts rather than reinventing the wheel, connecting diverse sectors through collaboration, shifting the dialogue about STEM to focus on inspiring curiosity in STEM and changing the messaging about math, and acknowledging the important role corporations play in community engagement.

Read the report at

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7. How to Submit to the AASWOMEN newsletter

To submit an item to the AASWOMEN newsletter, including replies to topics, send email to aaswomen_at_lists.aas.org .

All material will be posted unless you tell us otherwise, including your email address.

When submitting a job posting for inclusion in the newsletter, please include a one-line description and a link to the full job posting.

Please remember to replace “_at_” in the e-mail address above.

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8. How to Subscribe or Unsubscribe to the AASWOMEN newsletter

Join AAS Women List through the online portal:

To unsubscribe from AAS Women by email:

Go to https://aas.simplelists.com/aaswlist/subscribe/ , in the “My account and unsubscriptions”, type your email address. You will receive an email with a link to access your account, from there you can click the unsubscribe link for this mailing list.

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9. Access to Past Issues

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