Thursday, May 23, 2024

AASWomen Newsletter for February 2, 2024

AstronomyAASWomen Newsletter for February 2, 2024


AAS Committee on the Status of Women
Issue of February 2, 2024
eds: Jeremy Bailin, Nicolle Zellner, Sethanne Howard, and Hannah Jang-Condell

[We hope you all are taking care of yourselves and each other. –eds.]

This week’s issues:

1. Crosspost: How networking can bolster diversity in physics
2. Ground Hog’s Day
3. The Woman Who Completed the Brooklyn Bridge
4. Academia needs radical change — mothers are ready to pave the way
5. Margaret Mayall
6. Grace Hopper
7. Women and Girls in Astronomy 2024 celebration!
8. 2024 Annual ASP Awards Nominations open through March 15
9. Communicating Astronomy with the Public 2024 Conference
10. Job Opportunities
11. How to Submit to the AASWOMEN newsletter
12. How to Subscribe or Unsubscribe to the AASWOMEN newsletter
13. Access to Past Issues

An online version of this newsletter will be available at http://womeninastronomy.blogspot.com/ at 3:00 PM ET every Friday.


1. Crosspost: How networking can bolster diversity in physics

From: Nicolle Zellner via womeninastronomy.blogspot.com

By: Claire Malone for Physics World

Physicists sho want to see the world’s great challenges don’t just need deep technical expertise, but also
excellent networking skills… getting the most out of networking is all a question of practice – and providing those opposrtunities is key to increasing diversity in physics.

Read more at:

http://womeninastronomy.blogspot.com/2024/02/crosspost-how-networking-can-bolster.html

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2. Ground Hog’s Day

From: Sethanne Howard [sethanneh_at_msn.com]

By: Sethanne Noward

February 2 each year is a small holiday in the US: Ground Hog’s Day. The day also has astronomical significance. February 2 is the first cross quarter day of the year: half way between a solstice and an equinox. The other cross quarter days are May 1; August 1: and November 1. Cross quarter days are real astronomical events celebrated for millenia as special days. Each marks an ancient holiday thus making eight total astronomical holidays a year. Each one usually has been adopted by countries as relevant to their religion or calendar. Feb. 2 has several identities attached to it.

Read more at

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Groundhog_Day and

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quarter_days#:~:text=The%20cross%2Dquarter%20days%20are,All%20Hallows%20(1%20November).

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3. The Woman Who Completed the Brooklyn Bridge

From: Sethanne Howard [sethanneh_at_msn.com]

By: A Mighty Girl

When the Brooklyn Bridge was completed after fourteen years of construction, Emily Warren Roebling was the first to cross it by carriage, carrying a live rooster as a sign of victory. Early in its construction, Roebling’s husband, the chief engineer incharge of the bridge’s construction, became severely debilitated and bedridden due to decompression sickness. Emily Roebling stepped in to become the first female field engineer in history and supervised the bridge’s construction for over ten years until its successful completion. To read the incredible story of the “woman who saved the Brooklyn Bridge, visit https://arxiv.org/abs/2311.15364

Read more at:

https://www.amightygirl.com/blog?p=25975

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4. Academia needs radical change — mothers are ready to pave the way

From: Nicolle Zellner [nzellner_at_albion.edu]

By: Fernanda Staniscuaski

“In December, an academic incident made headlines in Brazil. An ad hoc reviewer for the National Council for Scientific and Technological Development (CNPq), one of the country’s main federal funding agencies, told social scientist Maria Carlotto that her pregnancies had held back her career. Carlotto tweeted about the comment, sparking general outrage and broader discussion of the rigid mindset concerning career progression in academia. Such outdated views have serious consequences: for more than 20 years, women have received only 35% of CNPq’s prestigious research productivity scholarships, and Black and Indigenous women are completely absent from the top ranks of CNPq fellowships.

Worldwide, mothers are too often pushed out of academia. But we are stepping up to push for a revolution in academia. Individuals and groups affected by the hostile academic environment should unite.”

Read more at (a subscription may be needed):

https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-024-00239-w

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5. Margaret Mayall

From: Sethanne Howard [sethanneh_at_msn.com]

By: Dorrit Hoffleit

27 January is the anniversary of the birth, at Iron Hill, Maryland on 27 Jan 1902, of the American astronomer Margaret Walton Mayall. Born Margaret Lyle Walton, she graduated from Radcliffe College in Cambridge, Massachusetts in 1928, and worked as an astronomer at Harvard College Observatory (pictured) from 1924 to 1954. She was also the director of the American Association of Variable Star Observers (AAVSO) from 1949 to 1973, and it was here that she met fellow AAVSO member Robert Newton Mayall whom she married in September 1927. In 1958 Margaret Walton Mayall received the Annie Jump Cannon Award in Astronomy (presented annually by the American Astronomical Society to a woman resident of North America for distinguished contributions to astronomy), although she is possibly best remembered for her revising of Thomas William Webb’s ‘Celestial Objects for Common Telescopes’ (which originally appeared in 1859) prior to its republication by Dover Publications in 1962. The minor planet 3342 Fivesparks, discovered on 27 Jan 1982 from Oak Ridge Observatory at Harvard, and which refers to the Mayall’s residence at 5 Sparks Street (hence Fivesparks) in Cambridge, Massachusetts, was named in honour of Margaret Walton Mayall and her husband Robert Newall Mayall.

Read more at: https://baas.aas.org/pub/margaret-walton-mayall-1902-1995/release/1

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6. Grace Hopper

By: The Harvard Gazette

On this day (Jan 27) in 1947, computing pioneer Grace Hopper reported the world’s first computer bug: a moth inside the Harvard Mark II. The moth that had gotten smashed in one of the electromechanical relays. It was retrieved and pasted into the log book with Scotch tape. “Panel F (moth) in relay,” the entry noted. “First actual case of bug being found.” From then on, they referred to ferreting out glitches as “debugging the machine.”

In the photo from the Harvard Archives, Hopper is at work on that computer’s predecessor, the Mark I. She was equally able to translate the highly technical processes of the computer into a language that her managers could understand, and so was assigned to write what would become the world’s first programming manual, a 500-page book that was both a history of the Mark I and a guide to programming it.

Read more about Grace Hopper: http://hvrd.me/Ibqx3043BRD

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7. Women and Girls in Astronomy 2024 celebration!

From: Sethanne Howard [sethanneh_at_msn.com]

By: IAU Women and Girls in Astronomy

“Join the Women and Girls in Astronomy 2024 celebration! From 11 February to 8 March, we will be featuring profiles of astronomers throughout history, highlighting events dedicated to Women and Girls in Astronomy, sharing activities and best practices in gender-inclusive astronomy outreach and more!

Follow the link for more ideas on how to celebrate:”

Read more at: https://www.iau.org/public/women-and-girls-in-astronomy/

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8. 2024 Annual ASP Awards Nominations open through March 15

From: Sethanne Howard [sethanneh_at_msn.com]

By: ASP staff

The ASP recognizes individual achievements in astronomy research, technology, education, and public outreach each year. Recipients of our awards have included luminaries such as Edwin Hubble, Vera Rubin, Isaac Asimov, Margaret Burbidge, Carl Sagan, and most recently, Katherine Johnson.

The Awards nominations are now accepted annually from early January through March 15. The nomination and distribution schedule can be found on each individual Awards page. We recommend reading the Guidelines for each Award in advance of the submission deadline. Most of the awards are open for nominations from the public unless specified. Announcements are made early Summer of each year. A celebration Awards Gala is held in November in the Bay Area, California.

Read more at:

https://astrosociety.org/who-we-are/awards/about-the-asp-awards.html

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9. Communicating Astronomy with the Public 2024 Conference

From: Sethanne Howard [sethanneh_at_msn.com]

By: IAU

Registration and abstract submission are open for the Communicating Astronomy with the Public 2024 (CAP 2024) conference. It will take place from 24 to 28 June 2024 in Cité de l’espace, Toulouse, France, and online, organised by the International Astronomical Union (IAU) Commission C2 and the IAU Office for Astronomy Outreach.

The CAP conference is the largest communication conference devoted to astronomy. Whether you are a researcher or practitioner, we invite you to submit abstracts under the theme of ‘Communicating Astronomy in a Hybrid World’. In addition to oral presentations, posters, and workshops, we also invite abstracts for cool demonstrations, planetarium shows, innovative networking events, and thought-provoking panel discussions. The SOC offers English language editing support to applicants who may need it.

A limited number of grants and fee waivers are available.

Deadline for abstracts: Feb 15

Read more at: https://www.iau.org/news/announcements/detail/ann23046/

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10. Job Opportunities

For those interested in increasing excellence and diversity in their organizations, a list of resources and advice is here:

https://aas.org/comms/cswa/resources/Diversity#howtoincrease

– Deputy Director IAU Office of Astronomy for Development, Cape Town, South Africa

https://iau.org/news/announcements/detail/ann23044/

– Upcoming Heliophysics/Planetary Science Civil Servant Position at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center

https://www.usajobs.gov

– Postdoctoral research associate to work with Dr. Catherine Elder at JPL

https://citjpl.wd5.myworkdayjobs.com/Jobs/job/JPL-Campus/Postdoc–Understanding-lunar-surface-processes-using-LRO-Diviner_R4872

– Director of Development Yerkes Observatory/ Yerkes Future Foundation

https://www.campbellcompany.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/YFF-PG-01.2024-2.pdf?_gl=1

– Astronomy instructor at Santa Rosa Junior College

https://www.schooljobs.com/careers/santarosajc/faculty/jobs/4347576/astronomy-tenure-track-instructor

– tenure-track position at Chabot College, a community college in Hayward, CA

https://clpccd.peopleadmin.com/postings/2903

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11. How to Submit to the AASWOMEN newsletter

To submit an item to the AASWOMEN newsletter, including replies to topics, send email to aaswomen_at_lists.aas.org .

All material will be posted unless you tell us otherwise, including your email address.

When submitting a job posting for inclusion in the newsletter, please include a one-line description and a link to the full job posting.

Please remember to replace “_at_” in the e-mail address above.

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12. How to Subscribe or Unsubscribe to the AASWOMEN newsletter

Join AAS Women List through the online portal:

To Subscribe, go to https://aas.simplelists.com/aaswlist/subscribe/ and enter your name and email address, and click Subscribe. You will be sent an email with a link to click to confirm subscription.

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Go to https://aas.simplelists.com, in the “My account and unsubscriptions”, type your email address. You will receive an email with a link to access your account, from there you can click the unsubscribe link for this mailing list.

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13. Access to Past Issues

http://womeninastronomy.blogspot.com/search/label/AASWOMEN

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