Thursday, May 23, 2024

AASWomen Newsletter for March 01, 2024

AstronomyAASWomen Newsletter for March 01, 2024


AAS Committee on the Status of Women
Issue of March 1, 2024
eds: Jeremy Bailin, Nicolle Zellner, Sethanne Howard, and Hannah Jang-Condell

[We hope you all are taking care of yourselves and each other. –eds.]

This week’s issues:

1. Crosspost: DEIA Activism in Astronomy
2. IAU Women and Girls in Astronomy Program
3. Space Weapons
4. Men Forget About Female Researchers, Says Study On Gender Citation Gap
5. IAU WG: Women in Astronomy
6. STEM Calendar – Leap Day
7. March 8 – International Women’s Day
8. Opportunity for Early Career Researchers
9. Astromycology in Space Exploration
10. 2024 NASA Planetary Science Summer School Applications Due March 27, 2024
11. Indigenous women find their stride in physics
12. Women in Physics: an interview with Lyndsay Fletcher
13. The new Dr Renu Sharma scholarship to help more women, First Nations people to reach for the stars
14. How to Submit to the AASWOMEN newsletter
15. How to Subscribe or Unsubscribe to the AASWOMEN newsletter
16. Access to Past Issues

An online version of this newsletter will be available at http://womeninastronomy.blogspot.com/ at 3:00 PM ET every Friday.


1. Crosspost: DEIA Activism in Astronomy

From: Nicolle Zellner via womeninastronomy.blogspot.com

By: Jörg Matthais Determann

Since the first half of the twentieth century, an increasing number of astronomers have pursued parallel careers
as both academics and activists. Besides publishing peer-reviewed papers, they have promoted a variety of underrepresented groups within their discipline.

Read more at:

http://womeninastronomy.blogspot.com/2024/02/deia-activism-in-astronomy.html

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2. IAU Women and Girls in Astronomy Program

From: Sethanne Howard [sethanneh_at_msn.com]

By: WGAP Heising-Simons Foundation

The Women and Girls in Astronomy Program is looking to fund ten projects that use astronomy for development activities to promote, support, and uplift women and girls in the field. Qualifying projects must align with at least one of the NA-ROAD’s five Strategic Goals 1 through 5, and take place in Canada, United States, the Caribbean, Mexico, or Greenland. Projects are encouraged to approach astronomy from a unique lens, including, but not limited to, scientific, social, technical, cultural, and artistic perspectives. 2024 chosen projects will be awarded with $2,000 USD mini-grants and project leaders will join the WGAP network as WGAP Fellows. This network is composed of industry and academic professionals who are willing to support women and girls in astronomy, while facilitating connections between women and girls in astronomy.

The deadline for project proposals is March 15th, 2024 at 11:59 PM EDT

Read more at

Women and Girls Astronomy Program

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3. Space Weapons

From: Sethanne Howard [sethanneh_at_msn.com]

By: Fraser Cain & Dr. Pamela Gay

The 365 Days of Astronomy Podcast is produced by Planetary Science Institute. On February 26 they learned that Russia might be planning nuclear weapons to take out satellites in space. What is the current and future possibility of weapons in space and what are the treaties designed to prevent them?

Read more at:

https://cosmoquest.org/x/365daysofastronomy/category/podcast/

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4. Men Forget About Female Researchers, Says Study On Gender Citation Gap

From: Nicolle Zellner [nzellner_at_albion.edu]

By: Kim Elsesser

In the field of psychology, studies have shown a citation gap, where the research contributions of men are referenced more often than those of women. A new study offers a potential explanation for the discrepancy—male researchers forget about women’s contributions.

Despite representing two-thirds of psychology faculty members, women’s academic contributions are cited less often than men’s—with papers featuring women as first or last authors receiving around 30% fewer citations than those with men as first or last authors.

The new study, “I Forgot That You Existed: Role of Memory Accessibility in the Gender Citation Gap,” published in American Psychologist suggests that male professors’ publications might receive more citations because men more readily recall their male colleagues’ work.

Read more at

https://www.forbes.com/sites/kimelsesser/2024/02/26/men-forget-about-female-researchers-says-study-on-gender-citation-gap/?sh=2f30da56152c

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5. IAU WG: Women in Astronomy

From: Sethanne Howard [sethanneh_at_msn.com]

By: Daniela Lazzaro (IAU)

Back in 2003, at its XXV General Assembly in Sydney (Australia), the IAU recognised and supported the needs and endeavours of women astronomers through the establishment of an Executive Committee (EC) Working Group (WG). Its mandate is to collect information, propose measures, and initiate actions in support of, or to advance equality of opportunity for achievement between women and men in astronomy, in the IAU and in the world at large. It acts as a federation of national Women in Astronomy organisations, creating links and facilitating information exchanges worldwide.

Read more at:

https://iau.org/science/scientific_bodies/working_groups/122/womeninastronomy/

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6. STEM Calendar – Leap Day

By: JPL Education

Leap Day is February 29, 2024. See the STEM activity on Leap Day Math at JPL.

Read more at:

https://www.nisenet.org/seasons#WINTER and

https://www.jpl.nasa.gov/edu/teach/activity/leap-day-math/

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7. March 8 – International Women’s Day

From: Sethanne Howard [sethanneh_at_msn.com]

By: Ideas for all seasons.

March is Women’s History Month. The March link for Winter at the site has a lot of women’s STEM history information.

Read more at:

https://www.nisenet.org/seasons#WINTER

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8. Opportunity for Early Career Researchers

From: Nicolle Zellner [nzellner_at_albion.edu]

By: Tiffany Stone Wolbrecht [TWolbrecht@aui.edu]

I am reaching out to share an exciting opportunity that I hope you will share with others. Do you know an early career researcher (ECR) looking to connect with other researchers and practitionersin the areas of astronomy education, engagement, communication and culture? Please share this opportunity with them!

ASTRO ACCEL is a three-year NSF-funded project to develop a sustained global network of collaborators working within and across domains to accelerate research and research to practice. The ASTRO ACCEL initiative is looking to recruit a cohort of 8 early career researchers who will work collaboratively with the program for 2 years. As part of the cohort, they will:
• Engage with other ECRs, senior researchers, and practitioners to evolve international research collaborations;
• Expand their own professional network;
• Engage in professional development activities to support advancement in their career (virtual and in-person);
• Participate in research on network development and implementation, and explore needs specific to ECRs;
• Have opportunities to contribute as time permits and is appropriate to a white paper on ECR needs and other research publications;
• Receive travel support to attend and participate in two international summits. The first Summit will take place in Cape Town, South Africa August 4-5, 2024 ahead of the International Astronomical Union’s General Assembly Meeting.The second Summit location and date is YTBD.

If you are anyone in your network or in your contacts might be interested, please send share this link: bit.ly/ECRnet

Please send out this application link ASAP because the application is due by March 24, 2024 at 11:59 PM (23:59) their local time.

Please send any questions you might have to Dr. Anica Miller Rushing at amillerrushing@aui.edu.

Read more at: http://bit.ly/ECRnet

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9. Astromycology in Space Exploration

From: Sethanne Howard [sethanneh_at_msn.com]

By: ASP Live Stream

On February 28 Dr. Marta Filipa Simões discussed how fungal ecology and biodiversity can behave in outer space and how biotechnology plays a pivotal role in addressing the pressing needs of humanity while safeguarding the delicate balance of our planet and our exploration of outerspace locations. Watch all Live Stream recordings on the Night Sky Network YouTube Channel.

Read more at:

https://astrosociety.org/get-involved/events/event-calendar.html/event/2024/02/28/free-live-nsn-webinar-series-astromycology-in-space-exploration-with-dr-marta-filipa-sim-es-/470787

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10. 2024 NASA Planetary Science Summer School Applications Due March 27, 2024

From: Nicolle Zellner [nzellner_at_albion.edu]

By: Joyce Armijo

I’d like to call your attention to the deadline of March 27, 2024, for application to the 36th annual NASA PlanetaryScience Summer School (PSSS) experience at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena CA. We would appreciate your help in getting the word out to help us gather a qualified pool of candidates. Please post the announcement and distribute the attached to yourcontacts who may have an interest, or who can suggest other qualified candidates to apply.

Read more at:

https://www.jpl.nasa.gov/edu/intern/apply/nasa-science-mission-design-schools/

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11. Indigenous women find their stride in physics

From: Sethanne Howard [sethanneh_at_msn.com]

By: Elainaa Saltclah

Elaina Saltclah, from the Red Mesa, Arizona area, near the Four Corners, first introduces herself in her native Navajo language, including the names of her clans. A Fort Lewis College student majoring in physics, with a minor in mathematics, and a young mother, Saltclah speaks with a self-assured smile, her confidence bolstered through participation in a novel program connecting students like her with a future in the daunting world of physics research.

“What made me interested in physics is simple curiosity into something ordinary, like the stars, or gravity,” Saltclah explained. “That fundamental curiosity about why things are the way they are is what drove me to the field.”

Read more at:

https://discover.lanl.gov/news/0215-flc-ntu/?utm_source=facebook&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=los+alamos+national+laboratory&utm_term=61cc4985-b45e-44e2-98ba-5dabb481ba4d&utm_content=article

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12. Women in Physics: an interview with Lyndsay Fletcher

From: Nicolle Zellner [nzellner_at_albion.edu]

By: the editors of Communications Physics

Lyndsay Fletcher is a Professor of Astrophysics, specialising in solar physics, in the School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow and the Rosseland Centre for Solar Physics, University of Oslo.

Her research is in solar flares using multi-wavelength imaging and spectroscopic observations from ground- and space-based observatories to study the magnetic field, energy transport, and energy dissipation in the solar atmosphere. Lyndsay is engaged in public understanding of science, giving frequent talks to amateur astronomy societies, schools and other groups. She has campaigned for diversity in physics and supports the Institute of Physics Juno Project. For her extensive work in promoting diversity in science, in 2017 Lyndsay received the Herald Scotland ‘Diversity Hero of the Year’ and the Suffrage Science award in the engineering and physical sciences category.

Read more at:

https://www.nature.com/articles/s42005-024-01561-5

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13. The new Dr Renu Sharma scholarship to help more women, First Nations people to reach for the stars

From: Jeremy Bailin [jbailin@ua.edu]

By: ICRAR

Dr Renu Sharma, the Chief Operating Officer and Director of Translation and Impact at the International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research (ICRAR), was recently honoured with a scholarship in her name. This initiative acknowledges her dedicated work promoting inclusivity and equality in Australian science.

ICRAR is thrilled to announce a new scholarship for women, Aboriginal and Torrest Strait Islanders studying astronomy and astrophysics at The University of Western Australia (UWA).

The scholarship is open to domestic students who have applied for a place to commence a Master of Physics degree course with a specialisation in Astronomy and Astrophysics.

Read more at:

Announcing the Renu Sharma Scholarship in Astronomy and Astrophysics

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14. How to Submit to the AASWOMEN newsletter

To submit an item to the AASWOMEN newsletter, including replies to topics, send email to aaswomen_at_lists.aas.org .

All material will be posted unless you tell us otherwise, including your email address.

When submitting a job posting for inclusion in the newsletter, please include a one-line description and a link to the full job posting.

Please remember to replace “_at_” in the e-mail address above.

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15. How to Subscribe or Unsubscribe to the AASWOMEN newsletter

Join AAS Women List through the online portal:

To Subscribe, go to https://aas.simplelists.com/aaswlist/subscribe/ and enter your name and email address, and click Subscribe. You will be sent an email with a link to click to confirm subscription.

To unsubscribe from AAS Women by email:

Go to https://aas.simplelists.com, in the “My account and unsubscriptions”, type your email address. You will receive an email with a link to access your account, from there you can click the unsubscribe link for this mailing list.

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16. Access to Past Issues

http://womeninastronomy.blogspot.com/search/label/AASWOMEN

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